The King's hut (Königshütte)

The  King's hut (german Königshütte) in Bad Lauterberg in the Harz Mountains is a historic foundry ensemble with buildings from the early 19th century. A few of the hut buildings still date from the first construction period around 1733. The historic foundry area was partly removed or converted in the course of extensions in the 20th century. Since October 2014 it is recognised as a "cultural monument of national importance".

Since the beginning of ore mining in the Harz mountains and around Bad Lauterberg, ironworks were built between the 16th and 18th centuries. In the years 1733 - 1737 the Königshütte was built as a new ironworks. It was the largest ironworks in the then Kurhannover state. The goods produced here were sold far beyond the borders of the Harz Mountains, including the world's first wire rope and, of course, artistically decorated castings for everyday use and furnace construction. Famous visitors, such as Goethe and King Jeromé, Napoleon's brother, as well as King Ernst August of Hanover and his son, King George V, appreciated the high-quality work of the royal smeltery, even then.

View of the hut yard with fountain
View of the hut yard with fountain
Overview of the Königshütte